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News & UCHP stories for international alumni

Big Ben

21 December 2016

Photo: Lizette KabréIt is 65 years since Ben Mottelson arrived in Denmark, and a further 25 since he was born in Chicago, USA. While his father was a practical man, Ben proved to have remarkable talent for abstract thought. For one of his high school projects, the two built a telescope together. Ben found the books which taught him to grind the perfect lens, which his father built the stand which allowed the lens to point to space.
The talents led Ben to a ph.d in nuclear physics from Harvard University in 1950 and opened the doors to the w...

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The big move - inside the new KUA3 buildings

14 December 2016

“A good study environment is about foundations, but also about what the students do. How do they make their voices heard. It is always tough with these kinds of processes that stretch out over long years. Now everything is completed, and many of those who have been part of that are no longer students.”
Photo: Dragør Luftfoto
That is the sentiment from Lars Østergaa...

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The morning view of a polar researcher

14 December 2016

Photo: Anders Fjeldberg
When station manager Casper T. Christiansen of the Arctic Station in West Greenland gets up in the morning and looks out to the east, his view is the picture above.
At the end of October there was a huge iceberg off the coast, and then there is something else in the picture.
If the reader believes he can see football goalposts on the beach exactly under the sun and just above the small, dark boxes, then the reader is right.
The explanation is that a wealthy man, originally from the harbour town of Qeqertarsuaq, who has made money from shrimp fishing, paid for and built a football field with astroturf, including football goalposts and changing rooms buildings....

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Whale shark genetics revealed by water samples

14 December 2016

The new environmental DNA method is a breakthrough in the study of marine animals and it does not require an encounter with and direct sampling of the animal itself.
Genetic variation in the DNA fragments isolated from water samples can be used to estimate population sizes, as well as investigating relatedness between different populations of the same species. The new results are published in the international journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.  
Every year from May to September off the coast of Qatar, one of nature’s most impressive phenomena plays out. Hundreds of whale sharks come together to feed on eggs from the tuna fish that spawn in the area....

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